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A quick one…

December 25, 2017

One of the things about Dynamo we love is the quick solution. OK – there are complex workflows we sometimes attempt and that is all fine and good and probably should be left to real programmers – but then, every day or two we encounter challenges  to tackle…

So – tonight, Christmas Day, easy day, I am just prepping an IFC for use in tomorrows task and while getting it into Revit is shows a load of room related warnings.

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The task is to use the IFC as a backdrop for a site model, so rooms are the least of concern for me right now and just lets nuke them out.

That’s the IFC in Revit (ouch – but that will be another story…)

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That’s the Dynamo:

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And that is all it needs – rooms gone – file performs well all is good…

More substantial Dynamo groove to come these days…

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Jingle Bells…

December 22, 2017

An very merry to all of you out there and our little creep in the attic chimes in – https://shutupandbim.wordpress.com/2017/12/22/and-a-very-merry-and-some-rants/

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Happiness is dry feet…

November 18, 2017

Another little Dynamo – this time we make sure that no water enters the basement and we”ll install a structural connection family at the bottom of the wall that joins basement wall and foundation slab together.

In Revit terms – positioning a line based family at the center line of the bottom of a wall.

That are the walls

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This is the Dynamo:

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The workflow:

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The result:

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Let’s quickly dissect the Dynamo:

This part only created the User Interface and if you want to know about that – please let me know.

Here is the more beefy part:

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At first we need to get al faces from the walls and identify the bottom ones:

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Very cool custom node – thanks to the Clockwork package

Next we need to get the perimeter curves of those surfaces:

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Here we find the points to construct a line to place our family along:

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Family placed, backed so that the next run will not remove already placed items.

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And the result:

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And life is good again…

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Zoo time…

November 17, 2017

Well – another challenge brought forward: find the contact surface between two joined walls and place a line-based family onto it.. think of this like a structural connection element that keeps a CMU wall connected to a cast in place wall.

Here’s the bigger picture:

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Let’s dissect the dynamo:

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This part utilizes the Data-Shapes Package to build a user interface to select the walls and the connecting family type. The result of this lokks like that:

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After selecting the elements we go into the main part of the script: first we get the geometric intersection of the surfaces of the wall…

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Now we extract the intersecting surface and construct a line use their u,v lines:

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Now that we have that we can place the family:Noname

And the end result is:

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Family placed… depending how fancy you want to be you could add a load of model detail into the family… maybe a later post…

But for now – life is good…

 

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Read the fine print

November 16, 2017

Printing a sheet set from Revit can be tedious, especially when you want to have a specific naming convention or such…

Let’s look at this Dynamo:

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Simply straightforward thanks to the Archi-lab_Grimshaw node:

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And it gives us a directory full of PDFs – and we do not like the default naming at all…

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So – time for the next Dynamo exercise – grab those files, rename them according to criteria we set, move them to a new location:

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What we do here is basically simple – we first construct a filename based on a set of criteria – target folder, Sheet Number, Sheet Name:

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Then we simply move the files providing the new names:

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And the result:

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That’s how we like it…

And life is good…

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Hurry on sundown…

November 12, 2017

A summary of this week – first of all, I just love silly error messages and our good old Revit app is full of them. Like this:

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Yes, really, I want to print a single sheet as a single sheet. Sure, that is just a little slip of developers attention, but – well – you know – this software is supposed to cost money. Would you tolerate this on your brand new Mercedes Benz? “Are you sure you want to drive me?” – comical at best…

No new Dynamo so far this week, sorry, too much other stuff going on…

From the department of “Tips and Tricks”: we got in a DWG that would violently refuse to display in Revit:

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Your keen eye might be able to see the one pixel – this is calling for trouble… so Wblock stuff out and clean it up

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Now the DWG looks like this

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Not too bad – lets get it into Revit:

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Nothing… long story short – the DWG had stuff > 33km in z – direction and that made Revit just tell me to well.. f$#* myself…

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Flattening a botched up DWG is not as simple as it sounds… any comments welcome but we found something…

Remedy – we take the DWG into a drafting view in Revit and downscale it

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Wow – the DWG becomes visible…

Next step – export to DWG again:

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In AutoCAD – flat as flat can be….

Back in Revit:

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Yeah – we see stuff… and the precision is not too bad…

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Life is good…

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clr.AddReference(‘RevitNodes’)

November 8, 2017

Oops – our friend got technical – but the workflow seems interesting – find it here.

Something for the road…

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More to come… Stay tuned, life is good…

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Unaware…

November 4, 2017

It’s been some time of quietness – the reason is that we were consumed with production work and not so much time has been left over for some creative thinking but – here we go – let’s dissect a workflow…

Goal is – we have a DWG that gives us outlines for a landscaping project and we want to convert all the different areas into floors for shaping the landscaping.

As expected the DWG looks like – well, a DWG you get from a consultant:

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So – how do we get from here to there:

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Step 1 – Dynamo and BimorphNodes:

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Model lines in Revit:

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Now we can isolate a loop and get a floor family created out of it:

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Step 2: Dynamo again…

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What we are doing here is pretty simple

  • collect the curves
  • join them together and create a surface
  • extrude the surface
  • create a family instance

And what we got – a Revit family with a free form element

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The mystery of the free form element still need disambiguation but that is topc of another night

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We’ll come to that – for now, life is good…

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News from the world

October 31, 2017

Our friend found this.

Dynamo 2.0 – big changes, lot’s of work in front of us…

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Life can’t be better…

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Shower, another shower

October 14, 2017

Some really nerdy Revit stuff… enjoy – this.

There is really a lot of project work and travelling coming up so it might get quiet.. for a couple of days…

 

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